Human Trafficking


Young girls are forced to sell sex by knocking on cab doors at truck stops.

Individuals may be forced to work in highly exploitative conditions with little to no pay.

Pimps use violence and coercion to commercially sexually exploit young women and girls.

Individuals are forced to prostitute on the streets and in hotels in order to meet nightly quotas and turn money over to their traffickers.

Human trafficking is a form of modern-day slavery where people profit from the control and exploitation of others. As defined under U.S. federal law, victims of human trafficking include children involved in the sex trade, adults age 18 or over who are coerced or deceived into commercial sex acts, and anyone forced into different forms of "labor or services," such as domestic workers held in a home, or farm-workers forced to labor against their will. The factors that each of these situations have in common are elements of force, fraud, or coercion that are used to control people.  Then, that control is tied to inducing someone into commercial sex acts, or labor or services.  Numerous people in the field have summed up the concept of human trafficking as "compelled service."  Every year, human traffickers generate billions of dollars in profits by victimizing millions of people around the world, and here in the United States.  Human trafficking is considered to be one of the fastest growing criminal industries in the world. Click here to access human trafficking resource packs.


Labor trafficking occurs in diverse contexts that encompass all forms of labor or services.  Common places where forced labor has been found in the United States include domestic servitude and small-scale "mom and pop" labor operations, to more large-scale operations such as farms and factories.  Certain labor brokers that supply labor to multinational corporations have also been identified as an emerging type of labor traffickers.  Sex trafficking includes commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC), as well as every instance where an adult is in the sex trade as the result of force, fraud, or coercion.  Sex trafficking occurs within numerous venues in the broader sex industry, commonly found in street prostitution, online escort services, residential brothels, and brothels disguised as massage businesses. Under U.S. and international law, commercially sexually exploited children found in the sex trade are considered to be victims of trafficking, even if no force or coercion is present.

Victims of human trafficking in the United States include U.S. citizens or foreign nationals, adults or minors, and men or women.  Foreign-born victims in the U.S. may be either documented or undocumented.

Because human trafficking is considered to be one of the fastest growing criminal industries, the U.S. government and academic researchers are currently working on an up-to-date estimate of the total number of trafficked persons in the United States annually.  With 100,000 children estimated to be in the sex trade in the United States each year, it is clear that the total number of human trafficking victims in the U.S. reaches into the hundreds of thousands when estimates of both adults and minors and sex trafficking and labor trafficking are aggregated.

Click here for information about human trafficking statistics in the U.S and abroad.

Click here for information about state, federal, and international anti-trafficking laws.

Click here to report a tip

dishwasher2
Forms of forced labor have been found in numerous places in the United States, including cases of people forced to work in restaurants.
victim2
It is estimated that there are 100,000 children in the sex trade in the United States each year.